“Simon’s Saga,” Vocabulary from Episode 34 – 25 Words

vignette

a brief literary description

There was that vignette due for Miss Bridget tomorrow morning at ten.
aptitude

inherent ability

Simon, I think you have aptitudes you’re not using. I do not accept that in my students.
derivative

not original; secondary

I want you—your voice, your style, your ideas—not something derivative or a mere pastiche.
pastiche

a work of art that imitates the style of some previous work

I want you—your voice, your style, your ideas—not something derivative or a mere pastiche.
fanatical

marked by excessive enthusiasm for a cause or idea

Within this category he had perceived two subgroups: the truly dedicated and the fanatically dedicated.
ineffectual

not producing an intended consequence

Charm was completely ineffectual on them.
rationalization

a defense mechanism explaining actions in non-threateningly

Any excuse outside of death was considered a rationalization
posthumously

after death

and even the Big D had to be well documented and justified, posthumously, of course, in clear, concise language, or your grade wouldn’t appear on your transcript.
archetype

something that serves as a model

Of this dedicated type, Miss Bridget was the archetype.
multiplicity

a large number

Videos, scouting reports, playbooks—a multiplicity of things to study.
obliterate

do away with completely, without leaving a trace

You see, Miss Bridget, we still have to obliterate them, and we have absolutely no idea whether the way we’re planning to do it will do the trick.
extenuating

partially excusing or justifying

I even admit that in this case there are some extenuating circumstances.
judicious

marked by the exercise of good judgment in practical matters

However, you’ll have to learn to plan your time more judiciously.
vermin

any of various small animals or insects that are pests

Maybe we’re vermin to be exterminated, as in Independence Day.
devoid

completely wanting or lacking

They’re probably totally devoid of concern for our species.
obeisance

bending the head or body in reverence or submission

I pay obeisance to you in the name of Dickens, Twain, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, Mailer, and all the saints, both living and dead.
luminary

a celebrity who is an inspiration to others

And hadn’t no less a luminary in American literature than Willa Cather opined that, “There are only two or three great human stories, and they go on repeating themselves as fiercely as if they had never happened before.”
opine

express one’s view openly and without fear or hesitation

And hadn’t no less a luminary in American literature than Willa Cather opined that, “There are only two or three great human stories, and they go on repeating themselves as fiercely as if they had never happened before.”
subterranean

lying beyond what is openly revealed or avowed

Well, if that were true, his novel must be really subterranean, so far down in his psyche that it might as well not exist.
banal

repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse

He’d be lucky to write a decent page that wasn’t totally banal and insipid.
prose

ordinary writing as distinguished from verse

Especially when she was described in powerful, dramatic, unadorned prose: “The pretty girl was sitting across from me in class. She looked at me. I looked at her.
superfluous

more than is needed, desired, or required

No superfluous words or figurative language to distract the reader from the subject.
figurative

not literal

No superfluous words or figurative language to distract the reader from the subject.
context

the set of facts or circumstances that surround a situation

Of course, for the average guy, in this context “persons” basically meant girls.
keen

demonstrating ability to recognize or draw fine distinctions

He would be Balzac, keenly observing Parisian life.

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