30 GRE Words Beginning with “T” “U” “V” and “W” – 30 Words

taciturn

habitually reserved and uncommunicative

Daniel Day-Lewis also showed up; the normally taciturn actor looked jovial, socializing with tablemates.
New York Times (Apr 24, 2013)
temperance

the trait of avoiding excesses

Thus, pride is opposed to humility, gluttony to temperance—two different virtues.

tendentious

having a strong bias, especially a controversial one

Mr. Medvedev’s decision comes in a tendentious political context, as Mr. Lukashenko, once the Kremlin’s staunchest regional allies, hangs back from key Russian initiatives.
New York Times (Jun 21, 2010)
terse

brief and to the point

In a terse statement, the embassy confirmed an “incident,” but gave few details.
Reuters (May 28, 2013)
thoroughgoing

performed comprehensively and completely

Fixlein possessed a more thoroughgoing genius, and had completely mastered the whole enterprise in sixteen days.
Paul Jean
thrift

extreme care in spending money

“ Thrift means not buying stuff, turning down the heat, not making five trips to town a week,” he said.
New York Times (Dec 1, 2011)
tranquil

not agitated

One person’s tranquil small town might make another go stir-crazy, while someone from Texas might shiver just at the thought of moving to Maine.
Time (May 13, 2013)
transcend

be superior or better than some standard

But his writing — supple, vivid, graceful — transcended mere reportage, and his service to aspiring writers was immeasurable.
New York Times (May 21, 2013)
trifling

not worth considering

“But even a trifling difference multiplied a million times is big,” he says.
Science Magazine (May 28, 2013)
trite

repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse

In trendy, eclectic, overexposed Brooklyn as packaged for TV, even the sagacity has turned trite.
New York Times (May 27, 2013)
tumultuous

characterized by unrest or disorder or insubordination

As tumultuous societal changes transform Bangalore, many young, middle-class Indians are struggling to cope.
New York Times (Aug 13, 2012)
undemonstrative

not given to open expression of emotion

Manning’s body language was more still and observant, hands on hips, surveying, slope shouldered, undemonstrative.
Washington Post (Oct 21, 2012)
underscore

give extra weight to

The incident, which took place on Tuesday, underscores growing concern that Syria’s more than two-year-old civil war is dragging in neighboring states.
Reuters (Jul 17, 2013)
unprecedented

novel; having no earlier occurrence

As well as unprecedented ticket sales, media interest has also reached record levels with 705 representatives set to cover the tournament.
BBC (Jul 9, 2013)
unseemly

not in keeping with accepted standards of what is proper

It was a raucous evening in which people ended up on strangers’ laps, chanted ribald phrases, found themselves onstage doing unseemly things.
New York Times (Nov 30, 2011)
variability

the quality of being uneven and lacking uniformity

Terry Marsh from CEH said: “Rainfall charts show no compelling long-term trend – the annual precipitation table shows lots of variability.”
BBC (Oct 18, 2012)
variegated

having a variety of colors

The leaves had assumed their gorgeous autumnal tints, and the masses of timber, variegated in colour, presented an inexpressibly beautiful appearance.
William Harrison Ainsworth
venal

capable of being corrupted

Nearly everyone in it is venal, petty, grasping, vicious, bent on serving heaping cold platters of revenge.
New York Times (Sep 28, 2010)
venue

the scene of any event or action

A wander around confirms crystal clear sound throughout, backing up the venue’s claim that there are no bad seats.
The Guardian (Jul 25, 2013)
verifiable

capable of being tested by experiment or observation

As with any candidate, you absolutely must make sure the person is a known quantity with a proven, verifiable track record.
Inc (Jun 24, 2013)
viable

capable of life or normal growth and development

Comedians have been viable political voices – both as participants and commentators – for a quite a few years now in the US.
The Guardian (Mar 4, 2013)
vigorous

characterized by forceful and energetic action or activity

Butler’s vigorous manner contrasts with laid-back bartender and pub owner Brenden, younger but also still single, given a quietly staunch presence by Billy Carter.
Seattle Times (May 24, 2013)
virulence

extreme harmfulness

Typhoid fever, the enemy which no army can conquer, broke out with distressing virulence, and a considerable number died of disease.
Anonymous
visionary

a person with unusual powers of foresight

Coverley’s walkers are professional outsiders; visionaries and dreamers on the road.
The Guardian (Aug 9, 2012)
vituperative

marked by harshly abusive criticism

His tone towards them is almost always contemptuous, where it is not positively vituperative.
Various
vociferous

conspicuously and offensively loud

The complaints grew so loud and vociferous that even President Obama was forced to address the backlash from Lisbon on Saturday.
New York Times (Nov 23, 2010)
volubility

the quality of being facile in speech and writing

The moment before she had confronted us, a silent agonised woman; now her words rattled forth with such feverish volubility we scarcely knew her.
Anna Katharine Green
vulnerable

capable of being wounded or hurt

“He’s suddenly no longer the fearless assassin but he’s actually quite vulnerable down there because there’re sharks and other dangerous creatures,” Luehe said.
Forbes (Aug 1, 2013)
warrant

show to be reasonable or provide adequate ground for

His report did not specify what the issues were, but said further investigation might be warranted.
New York Times (Jun 17, 2013)
withering

wreaking or capable of wreaking complete destruction

Israel had relied initially on aerial bombing, shifting to a ground offensive only after days of withering guerrilla rocket attacks on its northern towns.
Reuters (Oct 29, 2012)

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