30 GRE Words Beginning with “K” “L””M” and “N” and “O” – 30 Words

keen

intense or sharp

Hogan’s clear, resonant voice, his keen alertness and confident bearing radiate strength and determination.
Seattle Times (Jul 19, 2013)
larva

the immature free-living form of most invertebrates and amphibians and fish which at hatching from the egg is fundamentally unlike its parent and must metamorphose

Burying beetles – also known as sexton beetles – prepare and bury animal carcasses, which they use for breeding, laying eggs and rearing larvae.
BBC (Jun 18, 2013)
lassitude

a feeling of lack of interest or energy

An enfeebling spell seemed to have been taken off his mind; and the lassitude of doubt and indecision was gone.
G. P. R. (George Payne Rainsford) James
latitude

freedom from normal restraints in conduct

It also gave many employees, Snowden included, too much latitude to access records.
Washington Post (Jul 18, 2013)
lax

without rigor or strictness

Boats in India are often overloaded, and lax safety standards mean accidents are common on the river.
BBC (Jul 12, 2013)
lionize

assign great social importance to

Lionized in American history for his soaring defense of individual liberty, Jefferson’s extensive slaveholdings have been curiously downplayed, dismissed as beyond his control, or excused.
Seattle Times (Oct 28, 2012)
lure

provoke someone to do something through persuasion

Greater competition means mattress sellers are having to adapt to lure and keep customers — with tactics like price matching, zero percent financing and same-day delivery.
Chicago Tribune (Jul 21, 2013)
lurid

glaringly vivid and graphic; marked by sensationalism

Like many of Khan’s supporters, he’s wearied by Pakistan’s crippling energy shortages, long-souring economy, near daily terrorist attacks and lurid tales of official corruption.
Time (May 10, 2013)
malignant

dangerous to health

Admissions boards can seem capricious and impenetrable, if not malignant, to many prospective freshmen.
New York Times (Feb 2, 2012)
manacle

confine or restrain with or as if with handcuffs

Steven Spielberg, fantast supreme, always felt manacled by movie reality.
Time (Dec 21, 2011)
marginalization

the social process of becoming or being made marginal

On the one hand, it’s great to hear that people are listening and taking steps to prevent marginalization of women.
Forbes (Mar 22, 2013)
meld

lose its distinct outline or shape; blend gradually

As these videos suggest, scientists are taking tiny, incremental steps toward melding humans and machine all the time.
New York Times (Jun 1, 2013)
metabolic

of or relating to metabolism

It is also used to treat metabolic syndrome, a combination of diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.
BBC (Jul 30, 2013)
methodology

the techniques followed in a particular discipline

However, different studies define food deserts and relevant populations differently, so differences in methodology can yield two completely different results.
Scientific American (May 28, 2013)
meticulous

marked by precise accordance with details

The robbery was marked by meticulous planning, inside information and swift execution — 8 armed men in 11 minutes — that left investigators marveling.
New York Times (Jun 15, 2013)
migration

the movement of persons from one locality to another

Social problems typical of Central Asia today, like abuse of heroin smuggled from Afghanistan, labor migration and growing Islamic fundamentalism, are creeping into the city.
New York Times (Jun 18, 2013)
misnomer

an incorrect or unsuitable name

But that’s a misnomer – reindeer moss is in fact lichen.
The Guardian (Dec 22, 2012)
monopolize

have and control fully and exclusively

He talks much in an animated monologue, though the common complaint that he monopolizes the conversation is not a just one.
Various
monotonous

tediously repetitious or lacking in variety

Seders were built around rigid scripts, resulting in monotonous hours of guests taking turns reading flat passages about plagues and freed slaves.
Washington Post (Mar 24, 2013)
nave

the central area of a church

Terry looked as if he would far rather have his soul damned under a Gothic nave.—”That’s simply buying ’em off,” he said.
Oliver Onions
nomadic

migratory

His parents, who belong to a Punjabi nomadic tribe and live in temporary, thatched shelters, have moved to other grounds.
BBC (Jul 24, 2013)
notoriety

the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality

Although he sometimes bristled at his Watergate notoriety, Mr. Garment professed no lasting scars from the episode, the biggest political scandal of the century.
New York Times (Jul 15, 2013)
novel

original and of a kind not seen before

Other researchers are working on novel approaches such as genetically modifying mosquitoes so they can’t harbor parasites.
Scientific American (Jul 29, 2013)
novelty

originality by virtue of being new and surprising

The new downtown productions, by embedding theater inside a larger experience, have so far been able to persuade many people to pony up for novelty.
New York Times (Jun 23, 2013)
nuance

a subtle difference in meaning or opinion or attitude

Recognising things aren’t black and white means recognising nuance.
The Guardian (Jul 25, 2013)
obdurate

stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing

As the hard, stiff, corded muscle shrivelled, so shrivelled his obdurate, persistent self-confidence.
Marcus Dods
obscure

not clearly understood or expressed

But outside trading floors, business schools, banks and brokerage firms, bond dynamics are fairly obscure, surveys find.
New York Times (Jul 20, 2013)
obsequious

attempting to win favor from influential people by flattery

Maybe your obsequious staff laughing at your every quip makes you think you are hilarious.
The Guardian (Jul 16, 2013)
obsolete

no longer in use

They imply sadly that business schools are likely to go on teaching this now obsolete idea, even though the world outside has moved on.
Forbes (Jul 9, 2013)
orthodox

adhering to what is commonly accepted

Germany is advocating a reduction in budget deficits while pursuing an orthodox monetary policy whose sole objective is to control inflation.
The Guardian (Apr 30, 2013)

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