30 GRE Words Beginning with “I” – 30 Words

iconoclast

someone who attacks cherished ideas or institutions

Steadfast in his convictions and imperturbable under pressure, Mr. Miller was the ultimate iconoclast.
Wall Street Journal (Nov 18, 2011)
idiosyncrasy

a behavioral attribute peculiar to an individual

Beyond espionage, any public figure who combines grandiose ambition, perceived malign purpose and memorable idiosyncrasy will eventually be likened to a “Bond villain”.
The Guardian (Sep 28, 2012)
illiberality

a disposition not to be liberal (generous) with money

My creditors, whose insulting illiberality could only be equalled by their unbounded impositions, hourly assailed me.
Mary Robinson
illuminate

make free from confusion or ambiguity

The findings from this group illuminate the profound ways that dairy products have shaped human settlement on the continent.
Nature (Jul 31, 2013)
immigrate

come into a new country and change residency

Schoenberg died in 1951, 17 years after having immigrated to the United States, and his study at home in Brentwood, Calif., remained intact.
New York Times (Oct 10, 2012)
imminent

close in time; about to occur

He said his departure was imminent: he had bought a ticket to Accra leaving on Aug. 15.
New York Times (Jul 19, 2013)
immure

lock up or confine, in or as in a jail

Political prisoners, numbering as many as three or four hundred at a time, have been immured within its massive walls.
Mary Stuart Boyd
immutable

not subject or susceptible to change or variation

So maybe death and taxes are no longer certain, but one thing remains as immutable as the hills.
Salon (May 9, 2011)
imperceptibly

in a manner that is difficult to discern

Gradually, almost imperceptibly, our material environment gets better, smarter and lighter.
The Guardian (Feb 17, 2011)
impetuous

characterized by undue haste and lack of thought

Both have a headlong exuberance, are filled with caustic satire and ultimately show impetuous romance giving way to hard-headed realism.
The Guardian (Nov 22, 2012)
implement

pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue

As Singapore has shown, implementing such plans on a widespread scale can dramatically enhance wealth.
Forbes (Jul 31, 2013)
improvise

manage in a makeshift way; do with whatever is at hand

His wife turned a cut-rate apartment in affluent Cambridge into an improvised salon, offering facials at attractive prices.
Washington Post (Jul 17, 2013)
imprudent

lacking wise self-restraint

“Company stock was an imprudent, inappropriate and exceedingly risky investment.”
BusinessWeek (Mar 17, 2011)
incentive

a positive motivational influence

Since the crisis began, Ireland changed regulations to increase the incentives for domestic pension funds to buy Irish government bonds.
Wall Street Journal (Jul 11, 2013)
incongruous

lacking in harmony or compatibility or appropriateness

In this season the two things are incongruous, a skeletal figure wearing the tunic of an obese pastry chef.
The New Yorker (Sep 17, 2012)
indecorous

lacking propriety and good taste in manners and conduct

He, apparently, saw nothing indecorous in facts which must shock any other than the most depraved.
Anonymous
indemnify

secure against future loss, damage, or liability

Mr. Charles Fox took care to offer only such arrangement as should indemnify him from all risk in the undertaking.
Florence Fenwick Miller
indifferent

marked by a lack of interest

Yet, strange to say, I was not alarmed, but passively indifferent.
Edward Pollock Anshutz
indigenous

originating where it is found

The nascent republic — made up mostly of indigenous Malays, and Chinese, Indian and Tamil immigrants — was not unified by language, history or religion.
Nature (May 15, 2013)
indiscernible

difficult or impossible to perceive

If there is any pressing going on, it’s indiscernible to the naked eye.
The Guardian (Aug 25, 2010)
infer

reason by deduction; establish by deduction

Analysis of teeth found at archaeological sites, therefore, could help researchers infer demographic information about ancient populations.
Scientific American (May 22, 2013)
inhibit

limit, block, or decrease the action or function of

Defense attorneys will argue that brain trauma inhibited Russell’s judgment.
Reuters (May 6, 2013)
inimical

not friendly

Nutritionists know that crash dieting is inimical to healthy eating in the long run.
The Guardian (May 20, 2012)
injudicious

lacking or showing lack of judgment or discretion; unwise

Malzin lost his head, and made many injudicious concessions.
Ossip Schubin
intractable

difficult to manage or mold

But both countries have a deeper intractable challenge that will, in the longer-term, get worse.
Reuters (Jul 3, 2013)
intransigent

impervious to pleas, persuasion, requests, or reason

While some back-channel communications continued on Monday, each side sought to publicly portray the other as intransigent.
New York Times (Mar 28, 2011)
intrinsic

belonging to a thing by its very nature

“ Intrinsic motivation will be far more enduring than external incentives.”
New York Times (Sep 18, 2012)
invalidated

deprived of legal force

In recent years, courts have invalidated mayoral elections in Illinois and Indiana because of fraudulent absentee ballots.
New York Times (Oct 7, 2012)
invigoration

quality of being active or spirited or alive and vigorous

We, too, were somewhat tired; but the glorious sight that burst upon us, bathed our spirits afresh in the waters of invigoration.
Various
infallible

incapable of failure or error

While some entrepreneurs may have stronger attributes than others, none are infallible.

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