30 GRE Words Beginning with “G” and “H” – 30 Words

gainsay

take exception to

Tommy Eye was doing most of the talking, and it was plain that his opinions carried weight, for no one presumed to gainsay him.
Holman Day
galore

existing in abundance

There are opportunities galore in this new world, but Adams also highlights some of the threats.
Nature (May 29, 2013)
gambol

play or run boisterously

In the more open spaces jugglers and mountebanks, usually accompanied by performing animals, went through all sorts of gambols and antics.
Lewis Spence
gamut

a complete extent or range

The projects granted funding this week run the gamut from cutting edge research efforts to decidedly low-tech enterprises.
Washington Post (Nov 23, 2012)
gargantuan

of great mass; huge and bulky

Two gargantuan steam boilers fitted outside were connected to 13 cookers through pipes that ran across the roof of the kitchen.
New York Times (Jul 24, 2013)
garrulous

full of trivial conversation

Yes, these garrulous Russians are on occasion willing to shut up, most memorably at dinner while listening to a piece of prerevolutionary church music.
New York Times (May 6, 2013)
gastronome

a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment

Hail, Gastronome, Apostle of Excess, Well skilled to overeat without distress!
Ambrose Bierce
gawkiness

the carriage of someone whose movements and posture are extremely ungainly and inelegant

In another year he would doubtless lose all his gawkiness and become quite a gallant.
Émile Zola
gelid

extremely cold

Suddenly we are there, in this empty gallery, on a freezing morning, watching this man dust antiquities in the gelid, vodka light.
The Guardian (Mar 24, 2010)
gerrymander

divide voting districts unfairly and to one’s advantage

But Labour has accused the Conservatives of ” gerrymandering” – manipulating constituencies in order to achieve electoral advantage.
BBC (Jan 29, 2013)
gracious

exhibiting courtesy and politeness

Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich was gracious in defeat, saying Miami deserved their win.
Reuters (Jun 21, 2013)
grandiloquent

lofty in style

Presidents and prime ministers in the West have made grandiloquent speeches about making poverty history for fifty years.
Economist (Jun 2, 2013)
gravid

in an advanced stage of pregnancy

The gravid female always retains an upright position at this time, as indeed she does at other times.
Bernard Miall
hackneyed

repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse

But rather than old-fashioned witless xenophobia, his material is rooted in keen observational humour, which swaps hackneyed cliche for fresh insights.
The Guardian (Apr 13, 2013)
halcyon

idyllically calm and peaceful; suggesting happy tranquility

It began with two young women, each embarking on marriage in the halcyon days at the end of World War II.
Salon (Jul 15, 2012)
hallowed

worthy of religious veneration

British success on the hallowed turf of Wimbledon can bring untold rewards.
BBC (Jun 23, 2012)
hapless

unfortunate and deserving pity

Full-blown zombification takes place mere seconds after a hapless victim is fatally chomped.
Seattle Times (Jun 19, 2013)
harangue

a loud bombastic declamation expressed with strong emotion

He appears daily on television to harangue opponents and inaugurate public works, paying homage to his boss at every turn.
Reuters (Mar 1, 2013)
heed

careful attention

Other reasons included managers not checking what they were being told by sales staff, and a failure to heed warning signs going back several years.
BBC (May 10, 2013)
hegemony

the dominance or leadership of one social group over others

Though ubiquity and flexibility may give English hegemony, Twitter is also helping smaller and struggling languages.
Economist (Mar 29, 2012)
heinous

extremely wicked, deeply criminal

Four people responsible for “this heinous, vicious, cruel crime” were recently apprehended and charged with robbery, assault and other crimes, Booker said.
Reuters (Feb 13, 2013)
hermetic

completely sealed or airtight

“They’re enclosed spaces, hermetic worlds,” Mr. Rivers, 40, said recently of the environments in his films.
New York Times (Oct 7, 2012)
hiatus

an interruption in the intensity or amount of something

Navratilova says she recently began running again after a hiatus.
Washington Post (Jun 24, 2013)
hindrance

any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome

He said his predecessors had given Lockheed too much leeway earlier, when government oversight was considered “a hindrance more than a help
New York Times (Nov 28, 2012)
hirsute

having or covered with hair

Dudes With Beards Eating Cupcakes Photographic evidence that hirsute gentlemen enjoy dainty patisserie
The Guardian (Nov 19, 2010)
histrionic

characteristic of acting or a stage performance

Gone are the narrative histrionics and set pieces that have come to define the Gears campaign, replaced with something subtler.
The Guardian (Mar 23, 2013)
hoary

having gray or white hair as with age

Even the hoary Voyager 1 space probe, whose official mission ended three decades ago, is making news simply by leaving the building.
Time (Dec 6, 2012)
homiletic

of the nature of a homily or sermon

I remember hearing a sermon just before Purim, in Vienna, and the Jewish preacher gave an admirable homiletic explanation of this rule.
Israel Abrahams
humdrum

tediously repetitious or lacking in variety

But low-skilled and humdrum jobs, particularly in manufacturing, have gone overseas, or fallen victim to automation.
Economist (Nov 8, 2012)
hypothesize

believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds

You’re going to learn a lot more useful information from taking action rather than hypothesizing.
Inc(Aug 13, 2012)

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