30 GRE Words Beginning with “D” – 30 Words

debunk

expose while ridiculing

Everyone, as usual, put much more work into finding supporting evidence than debunking evidence.
Salon (Apr 19, 2013)
deflect

draw someone’s attention away from something

Still others said their opponents spent so much time deflecting questions about scandals, they never had to face more substantive criticism.
New York Times (Jul 17, 2013)
defy

resist or confront with resistance

Mr Weiner has so far defied calls to drop out of the election race
BBC (Jul 25, 2013)
degrade

reduce in worth or character, usually verbally

Such encryption could degrade the personalized services net companies are offering.
The Guardian (Jun 29, 2013)
deliberate

carefully thought out in advance

After talks between the two sides failed in recent days, Vivus accused First Manhattan of sending deliberate misinformation to fellow shareholders.
Reuters (Jul 19, 2013)
delineate

represented accurately or precisely

States rights are delineated in the Constitution and through judicial precedent.
Time (Apr 8, 2013)
demur

politely refuse or take exception to

Feeling lazy, I demurred — but when Mike brought it up again 15 minutes later, I gave in just to shut him up.
New York Times (Aug 23, 2012)
derivation

the act of obtaining something from a source or origin

No following can be more productive of a study and love of word derivations and allied word meanings than gardening.
Alice Morse Earle
deteriorate

become worse or disintegrate

But Mrs Shaw’s condition deteriorated and the booking was cancelled in early May.
BBC (Jul 25, 2013)
deterministic

an inevitable consequence of antecedent sufficient causes

It is governed by the assumptions of a deterministic, predictable world and focused on centralization, coercion, formality, tight rein, imposed discipline and obedience.
Forbes (Dec 11, 2012)
deviation

a variation from the standard or norm

Self-censorship — Doubts and deviations from the perceived group consensus are not expressed.
Washington Post (Jun 9, 2012)
didactic

instructive, especially excessively

Didactic, self-righteous and smug, full of easy slogans, this sort of art leaves people just as boxed in as the systems it supposedly critiques.
New York Times (Jan 9, 2012)
differentiate

mark as distinct

The novel’s five sections are strictly differentiated by tense, point of view and style.
The Guardian (Jul 27, 2013)
diffidence

lack of self-assurance

That would not please the base, but in today’s bitterly divisive politics, a bit more diffidence could go a long way.
Economist (Sep 27, 2012)
diffuse

spread out; not concentrated in one place

Also, Democrats tend to congregate in the same districts, while Republicans are more diffuse.
New York Times (Jan 28, 2013)
disaffection

the feeling of being alienated from other people

Some observers warn that popular disaffection may discredit all major political parties, eroding faith in the state itself.
Time (Aug 23, 2010)
disapprobation

pronouncing as wrong or morally culpable

“After all this while I had given up every expectation of seeing you again,” he said in a curt manner that betrayed his disapprobation.
F.E. Mills Young
discern

detect with the senses

In Thatcher’s case, Harris thought he discerned “a kind of megalomaniacal glint in the eye.”
Newsweek (Apr 8, 2013)
disgruntled

in a state of sulky dissatisfaction

Meanwhile, one disgruntled employee in New York hacked into and corrupted his former employer’s network, causing approximately $90,000 in damages.
Forbes (Jul 12, 2013)
dislocation

the act of disrupting an established order so it fails to continue

As factories automate, huge Asian economies originally built around cheap human labor—China and India in particular—are likely to suffer from even greater dislocations.
Newsweek (Feb 5, 2013)
disparate

including markedly dissimilar elements

After some teething issues, future incarnations will be more ambitious, cut down on red tape, and align disparate rules, a commission spokesman says.
Science Magazine (Jul 12, 2013)
dispassionate

unaffected by strong emotion or prejudice

However, unlike the current emotional debate surrounding gun control in the United States, the Swiss approach is more dispassionate and pragmatic.
Time (Mar 4, 2013)
disquieting

causing mental discomfort

There is a disquieting sense of lives being lost in real time.
New York Times (Jun 18, 2013)
disseminate

cause to become widely known

Video, filmed by an onlooker, was quickly picked up by news organizations and disseminated on social media.
Time (May 24, 2013)
dissolution

the termination or disintegration of a relationship

The singer’s wife had filed for dissolution of marriage in September last year, according to San Diego Superior Court documents.
BBC (May 8, 2013)
distinctive

of a feature that helps to identify a person or thing

Regarded as one of the world’s most successful and influential architects, Lord Rogers’ distinctive, eye-catching creations can be seen far and wide.
BBC (Jul 22, 2013)
divergence

a difference between conflicting facts or claims or opinions

Meanwhile, consumers are downright giddy, sharpening the divergence with gloomy corporations.
BusinessWeek (Oct 26, 2012)
diversify

make more varied

In order to sidestep the tighter security presence in Maiduguri, the Islamist militants have diversified their tactics.
BBC (Jul 23, 2013)
dogmatic

pertaining to a code of beliefs accepted as authoritative

His critics, generally dogmatic religious types, are merely one-dimensional villains.
New York Times (Aug 15, 2012)
dwelling

housing that someone is living in

While the group failed to locate a nest – hives are dwellings for domesticated honeybees – they identified and photographed at least three queens.
Reuters (Jul 19, 2013)

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