Words that end in ade

-ade A sweetened beverage of: limeade. Origin of -ade Middle English from Old French ultimately from Latin -āta feminine of -ātus -ate ; see -ate. counterblockadecontrary opposite countertradea form of international trade in which purchases made by an importing nation are linked to offsetting purchases made by the exporting nation harlequinadea play or pantomime in which Harlequin has a leading role overpersuadeto persuade to act contrary to one's conviction or preference rhodomontade degringoladea rapid decline or deterioration (as in strength, position, or condition) downfall switchbladea pocketknife having the blade spring-operated so that pressure on a release catch causes it to fly open called also switchblade knife plantigradewalking on the sole with the heel touching the ground digitigradewalking on the digits with the posterior of the foot more or less raised fanfaronadeempty boasting bluster rodomontadea bragging speech phyllocladea flattened stem or branch (as a joint of a cactus) that functions as a leaf retrogradeto turn back reverse masqueradeto disguise oneself centigraderelating to, conforming to, or having a thermometric scale on which the interval between the freezing point of water and the boiling point of water is divided into 100 degrees with 0° representing the freezing point and 100° the boiling point abbreviation C compare celsius balustradea row of balusters topped by a rail nightshadebelladonna 1 multigrademany multiple much chiffonadeshredded or finely cut vegetables or herbs used especially as a garnish pasquinadea lampoon posted in a public place carbonnadea beef stew cooked in beer tardigradeany of a phylum (Tardigrada) of microscopic invertebrates with four pairs of stout legs that live usually in water…

-ade

A sweetened beverage of: limeade.

Origin of -ade

Middle English from Old French ultimately from Latin -āta feminine of -ātus -ate ; see -ate.

counterblockade
contrary opposite

countertrade
a form of international trade in which purchases made by an importing nation are linked to offsetting purchases made by the exporting nation

harlequinade
a play or pantomime in which Harlequin has a leading role

overpersuade
to persuade to act contrary to one’s conviction or preference

rhodomontade

degringolade
a rapid decline or deterioration (as in strength, position, or condition) downfall

switchblade
a pocketknife having the blade spring-operated so that pressure on a release catch causes it to fly open called also switchblade knife

plantigrade
walking on the sole with the heel touching the ground

digitigrade
walking on the digits with the posterior of the foot more or less raised

fanfaronade
empty boasting bluster

rodomontade
a bragging speech

phylloclade
a flattened stem or branch (as a joint of a cactus) that functions as a leaf

retrograde
to turn back reverse

masquerade
to disguise oneself

centigrade
relating to, conforming to, or having a thermometric scale on which the interval between the freezing point of water and the boiling point of water is divided into 100 degrees with 0° representing the freezing point and 100° the boiling point abbreviation C compare celsius

balustrade
a row of balusters topped by a rail

nightshade
belladonna 1

multigrade
many multiple much

chiffonade
shredded or finely cut vegetables or herbs used especially as a garnish

pasquinade
a lampoon posted in a public place

carbonnade
a beef stew cooked in beer

tardigrade
any of a phylum (Tardigrada) of microscopic invertebrates with four pairs of stout legs that live usually in water or damp moss called also water bear

intergrade
an intermediate form

biodegrade
capable of being broken down especially into innocuous products by the action of living things (as microorganisms)

orthograde
walking with the body upright

autostrade
an expressway especially in Italy

promenade
a place for strolling

downgrade
to lower in quality, value, status, or extent

marmalade
a clear sweetened jelly in which pieces of fruit and fruit rind are suspended

barricade
an obstruction or rampart thrown up across a way or passage to check the advance of the enemy

colonnade
a series of columns set at regular intervals and usually supporting the base of a roof structure

esplanade
one designed for walking or driving along a shore

cavalcade
a procession of riders or carriages

motorcade
a procession of motor vehicles

lampshade

fusillade
a number of shots fired simultaneously or in rapid succession

remoulade
a pungent sauce or dressing resembling mayonnaise and usually including savory herbs and condiments

cannonade
to deliver artillery fire

gasconade
bravado boasting

antitrade

gallopade
galop

everglade
a swampy grassland especially in southern Florida usually containing saw grass and at least seasonally covered by slowly moving water usually used in plural

orangeade
a beverage of sweetened orange juice mixed with water

overtrade
to trade beyond one’s capital

croustade
a crisp shell (as of toast or puff pastry) in which to serve food

carronade
a short-barreled gun of the late 18th and 19th centuries that fired large shot at short range and was used especially on warships

ambuscade
ambush

twayblade
any of various orchids (genera Listera and Liparis) often having two leaves

readymade
something (as a garment) that is ready-made

matchmade

overshade

carbonade
a beef stew cooked in beer

bastinade
a blow with a stick or cudgel

overgrade

persuade
to move by argument, entreaty, or expostulation to a belief, position, or course of action

homemade
made in the home, on the premises, or by one’s own efforts

handmade
made by hand or by a hand process

lemonade
a beverage of sweetened lemon juice mixed with water

blockade
the isolation by a warring nation of an enemy area (as a harbor) by troops or warships to prevent passage of persons or supplies

accolade
a ceremonial embrace

dissuade
to advise (a person) against something

renegade
having deserted a faith, cause, or religion for a hostile one

serenade
a complimentary vocal or instrumental performance

marinade
marinate

escalade
an act of scaling especially the walls of a fortification

escapade
a usually adventurous action that runs counter to approved or conventional conduct

palisade
a fence of stakes especially for defense

stockade
a line of stout posts set firmly to form a defense

tapenade
a seasoned spread made chiefly with mashed black olives, capers, and anchovies

sunshade
something used as a protection from the sun’s rays as

enfilade
to rake or be in a position to rake with gunfire in a lengthwise direction

eyeshade
a visor that shields the eyes from strong light and is fastened on with a headband

glissade
a gliding step in ballet

subgrade
a surface of earth or rock leveled off to receive a foundation (as of a road)

defilade
to arrange (fortifications) so as to protect the lines from frontal or enfilading fire and the interior from fire from above or behind

reinvade

prograde
having or being a direction of rotation or revolution that is counterclockwise as viewed from the north pole of the sky or a planet

bigarade
sour orange

aquacade
a water spectacle that consists usually of exhibitions of swimming and diving with musical accompaniment

grillade

oeillade
ogle

remolade

overlade

autocade

galopade

paygrade

misgrade

outtrade

camisade

protrade

upgrade
to raise or improve the grade of as

brigade
a large body of troops

crusade
to engage in a crusade

cascade
to cause to fall like a cascade

brocade
a rich silk fabric with raised patterns in gold and silver

comrade
an intimate friend or associate companion

grenade
a small missile that contains an explosive or a chemical agent (as tear gas, a flame producer, or a smoke producer) and that is thrown by hand or projected (as by a rifle or special launcher)

degrade
to lower in grade, rank, or status demote

forbade
to proscribe from or as if from the position of one in authority command against

charade
a word represented in riddling verse or by picture, tableau, or dramatic action

pervade
to become diffused throughout every part of

roulade
a florid vocal embellishment sung to one syllable

ballade
a fixed verse form consisting usually of three stanzas with recurrent rhymes, an envoi, and an identical refrain for each part

cockade
an ornament (as a rosette) usually worn on a hat as a badge

limeade
a beverage of sweetened lime juice mixed with plain or carbonated water

parkade

regrade

saccade
a small rapid jerky movement of the eye especially as it jumps from fixation on one point to another (as in reading)

couvade
a custom in some cultures in which when a child is born the father takes to bed as if bearing the child and submits himself to fasting, purification, or taboos

tribade

alidade
a rule equipped with simple or telescopic sights and used for determination of direction as

torsade
a twisted cord or ribbon used especially as a hat ornament

passade

corrade
to crumble away through abrasion

aggrade

scalade
escalade

premade
earlier than prior to before

chamade

mismade

manmade
synthetic

gambade

prebade

prefade
earlier than prior to before

respade

decade
a group or set of 10 as

parade
a public procession

arcade
a long arched building or gallery

facade
a false, superficial, or artificial appearance or effect

invade
to enter for conquest or plunder

tirade
a protracted speech usually marked by intemperate, vituperative, or harshly censorious language

remade
to make anew or in a different form

unmade
not made

pomade
a fragrant hair dressing

abrade
to rub or wear away especially by friction erode

aubade
a song or poem greeting the dawn

noyade

pesade

unlade
to take the load or cargo from

comade

alcade

hexade

trade
of, relating to, or used in trade

grade
being, involving, or yielding domestic animals of improved but not pure stock

shade
to shelter or screen by intercepting radiated light or heat

blade
to skate on in-line skates

evade
to slip away

spade
a black figure that resembles a stylized spearhead on each playing card of one of the four suits

glade
an open space surrounded by woods

clade
a group of biological taxa (as species) that includes all descendants of one common ancestor

tsade

irade

stade
stadium 1a

made
fictitious invented

wade
to move or proceed with difficulty or labor

fade
insipid commonplace

jade
either of two tough compact typically green gemstones that take a high polish

cade
left by its mother and reared by hand pet

bade

lade
to put a load or burden on or in load

hade

sade
Comte Donatien-Alphonse-François 1740–1814 Marquis de Sade Fr. writer of erotica