GRE Ultimate – 465 Words

interminable

tiresomely long; seemingly without end

This is made more feasible by the growing abundance of natural gas and alternative fuels that give America other resources for cutting emissions.
New York Times (Jun 25, 2013)
indiscriminate

failing to make or recognize distinctions

Head Puritan and songwriter Jack Barnett has guided his band through three very disparate albums united by their near complete disregard for listener accessibility.
The Guardian (Jun 20, 2013)
badger

sturdy carnivorous burrowing mammal with strong claws

A fourth said the draft accord was already ready and waiting to be signed.
Reuters (Jul 25, 2013)
prudent

marked by sound judgment

But the risk, of course, was that an acerbic confrontation could turn off the very swing voters he covets.
New York Times (Oct 17, 2012)
ostensible

appearing as such but not necessarily so

And though they were not physically more robust, they reported less difficulty in getting around, possibly because of better adaptive equipment.
New York Times (Jul 17, 2013)
spurious

plausible but false

Silicosis, which has no known cure, is contracted by inhaling tiny particles of silica dust from gold-bearing rocks over many years underground without adequate protection.
Reuters (Jul 24, 2013)
milieu

the environmental condition

The games, held over four days, were set to take place in the United Center and on its adjacent parking lots.
Chicago Tribune (Jul 17, 2013)
deleterious

harmful to living things

Unlike Singapore, Malaysia has not publicly admonished Indonesia over the smog.
Reuters (Jun 27, 2013)
surfeit

indulge (one’s appetite) to satiety

Men given the drug also experienced fewer adverse effects, like bone pain and muscle weakness.
New York Times (Jul 17, 2013)
strident

unpleasantly loud and harsh

Aesthetics and ethics are related in complex ways, which make art less comforting than the art market would have us think.
The Guardian (Jun 8, 2013)
dissent

a difference of opinion

Like many selfish men, he could be good-natured so long as affability was cheap.
Lewis Wingfield
incumbent

necessary as a duty or responsibility; morally binding

My point is that the inequality affects growth through many channels.
New York Times (Jul 26, 2013)
consecrate

give entirely to a specific person, activity, or cause

But in a place filled with so many big personalities, Goodlatte can come across as aloof, boring or uninterested.
Washington Post (Jul 23, 2013)
contrite

feeling or expressing pain or sorrow for sins or offenses

There’s enough ambiguity that you could argue a given case in many different ways.
Slate (Jul 1, 2013)
continence

voluntary control over urinary and fecal discharge

There are job-creation programs and low-cost housing, but nothing has fully ameliorated the lingering injustices.
New York Times (May 7, 2013)
conundrum

a difficult problem

Mr. Saatchi’s public comments, though, have provided ample ammunition for detractors.
New York Times (Jul 5, 2013)
fetid

offensively malodorous

Net metering are only symptoms of this more fundamental disconnect between emerging market forces and an anachronistic model used to regulate those market forces.
Forbes (Jul 16, 2013)
mendicant

a pauper who lives by begging

Section 230 does not apply to cases involving intellectual property, federal criminal prosecutions, and violations of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act or analogous state laws.
Forbes (Jun 26, 2013)
meretricious

tastelessly showy

So some researchers have searched for signs of family relationships in the skeletons themselves, looking for rare anomalies that might suggest shared genetic heritage.
Science Magazine (Jun 19, 2013)
menagerie

a collection of live animals for study or display

Much about Lee whose missionary labors antedated Marcus Whitman’s by two years.
Various
repine

express discontent

Looking at the clock leads to two things antithetical to sleep, Grandner says — math and worry.
Washington Post (Jun 10, 2013)
rescind

cancel officially

Commencement speakers now and then worried about apathy born of cynicism and crisis fatigue.
New York Times (Jun 15, 2013)
reprobate

a person without moral scruples

In other words, just as we know, funding journalism over the coming decades remains a large headache without apparent easy solution.
The Guardian (Jul 26, 2013)
reprise

repeat an earlier theme of a composition

The National Human Rights Commission said it had credible reports of killings, torture, rape and arbitrary detention by security forces.
Reuters (Jul 3, 2013)
reparation

something done or paid in expiation of a wrong

A few days later, riders face three straight days of arduous climbing in the high Alps.
Seattle Times (Jul 8, 2013)
resolution

a decision to do something or to behave in a certain manner

Still, a prospective employer has a hard time ascertaining which candidate is best prepared for the highly specific job at hand.
Forbes (Feb 27, 2013)
resolve

find a solution or answer

“Yes, yes,—just so; of course,” said Barrington, hurriedly assenting to he knew not what.
Charles James Lever
contumacious

willfully obstinate; stubbornly disobedient

Astoundingly, Wasserman Media represented the No. 1 overall draft pick last year in five professional sports: men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, soccer and football.
New York Times (Jul 6, 2013)
contend

compete for something

At too low a dose, the therapeutic effects of the drug are attenuated.
Scientific American (Feb 4, 2013)
cursory

hasty and without attention to detail; not thorough

Unemployment and austerity measures have curbed consumer spending.
BBC (Jul 25, 2013)
indigenous

originating where it is found

In March, the Mid Devon district council in southwestern England attempted to banish apostrophes from all area street signs.
Slate (May 23, 2013)
bulwark

an embankment built around a space for defensive purposes

Speeds were measured yet urgent, belying his reputation as being, on occasion, a slow-ish Wagnerian.
The Guardian (Jul 23, 2013)
bulwark

an embankment built around a space for defensive purposes

In a global ice age beginning 72,000 years ago, many Africans fled the continent’s arid interior, heading for the more benign southern shore.
New York Times (Nov 12, 2012)
coterie

an exclusive circle of people with a common purpose

He acknowledged pocketing bribes from corrupt contractors in exchange for certifying bogus or inflated invoices for services that were never provided.
New York Times (Jul 12, 2013)
altruistic

showing unselfish concern for the welfare of others

In Wednesday’s speech, Obama advocated for bolstering manufacturing, investing in infrastructure, and bringing down the cost of higher education.
BusinessWeek (Jul 24, 2013)
altruistic

showing unselfish concern for the welfare of others

Raising his arms over his head, assuming poses, brandishing the putting iron like a sword.
The New Yorker (Jun 3, 2013)
temerity

fearless daring

He smoldered for eight innings in the Washington Nationals’ dugout, until Davey Johnson could keep Harper bridled no longer.
Washington Post (Jun 10, 2012)
virtuosity

technical skill or fluency or style exhibited by a virtuoso

One is the 1885 factory, which retains its original red-brick facade, exposed buttresses, oversized arched windows and chunky white “Peaks Mason Mints” lettering.
New York Times (Oct 20, 2012)
prolific

intellectually productive

Protections exist so workers “are not treated in an arbitrary and capricious way merely for political purposes.”
Reuters (May 30, 2013)
progeny

the immediate descendants of a person

He also said the mountains are dangerous, with regular landslides and other natural catastrophes.
New York Times (Jul 13, 2013)
progeny

the immediate descendants of a person

“Some people approach acting with all these things in their head, making it more complicated than it needs to be, way too cerebral,” he complained.
The Guardian (Jul 23, 2013)
amorous

inclined toward or displaying love

Yet the precise patterns on the runway, which at first glance looked like chevron rugs, were literally drawn in sand.
New York Times (Jun 26, 2012)
amorous

inclined toward or displaying love

The albums are listed in chronological order of their original release.
Time (Dec 25, 2012)
perpetrate

perform an act, usually with a negative connotation

In both cases, diplomatic security agents suggested that their investigations had been circumscribed or blocked by superiors.
New York Times (Jun 11, 2013)
consummate

having or revealing supreme mastery or skill

Zarghami’s comments about talks with Cuba were taken seriously until Mehr later clarified he was joking.
The Guardian (Jul 3, 2013)
consummate

having or revealing supreme mastery or skill

Clever coinages may be laughed at and enjoyed, but hardly ever adopted by users of the language.
BBC (Feb 18, 2011)
impeccable

without fault or error

But those good times bred complacency, and Mr. Bernanke’s recent comments have caused an abrupt change in perceptions.
New York Times (Jun 24, 2013)
impeccable

without fault or error

City inspectors have yet to investigate, but Mr. LaVorgna said the home was in compliance with the building code.
New York Times (Jul 24, 2013)
hoax

something intended to deceive

China has staunchly rejected such allegations, saying the Beijing government neither condones nor carries out computer hacking.
Washington Post (Feb 10, 2013)
gullible

naive and easily deceived or tricked

Others were backed by a bipartisan consensus, such as the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996.
Washington Post (Jul 17, 2013)
enigma

something that baffles understanding and cannot be explained

Neuroscientists have long known that sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation, helping to integrate newly learned information.
Scientific American (Jul 24, 2013)
subterfuge

something intended to misrepresent the nature of an activity

There are some signs that after years of penny-pinching, conspicuous spending is on the rise in Japan
New York Times (Jun 28, 2013)
exult

feel extreme happiness or elation

Heated debates ensue about whether earnest attempts to support science journalists constitute “establishment PR”.
The Guardian (Jul 5, 2013)
foment

try to stir up

Unlike conventional zoos, Mr Shingu’s Paper Zoo is made entirely using origami.
The Guardian (Jul 20, 2013)
minuscule

very small

Plentiful plaudits and copious commendations have followed, but I’m not so sure.
BBC (Apr 22, 2013)
militate

have force or influence; bring about an effect or change

Prosecutors said they could not corroborate allegations made by two witnesses against the general.
BBC (Apr 18, 2013)
minatory

threatening or foreshadowing evil or tragic developments

Week after week, he roamed the streets of New York, looking for work, and every night returned to Hoboken, crestfallen and disappointed.
Charles Gilson
mettle

the courage to carry on

The abuse, repeating words that Mr Sarkozy himself had used previously, was a crude version of “get lost!”
BBC (Jul 26, 2013)
misanthrope

someone who dislikes people in general

The military has postponed maintenance, curtailed training, canceled deployments and taken other steps to slash spending.
Reuters (Jul 8, 2013)
cupidity

extreme greed for material wealth

People who live rigorously by this cynicism are often seen as grumpy killjoys.
The Guardian (Jul 10, 2013)
irate

feeling or showing extreme anger

Everyone, as usual, put much more work into finding supporting evidence than debunking evidence.
Salon (Apr 19, 2013)
attest

provide evidence for

Still others said their opponents spent so much time deflecting questions about scandals, they never had to face more substantive criticism.
New York Times (Jul 17, 2013)
affinity

a natural attraction or feeling of kinship

Mr Weiner has so far defied calls to drop out of the election race
BBC (Jul 25, 2013)
forswear

formally reject or disavow

Such encryption could degrade the personalized services net companies are offering.
The Guardian (Jun 29, 2013)
formidable

extremely impressive in strength or excellence

After talks between the two sides failed in recent days, Vivus accused First Manhattan of sending deliberate misinformation to fellow shareholders.
Reuters (Jul 19, 2013)
forestall

keep from happening or arising; make impossible

States rights are delineated in the Constitution and through judicial precedent.
Time (Apr 8, 2013)
innate

present at birth but not necessarily hereditary

Feeling lazy, I demurred — but when Mike brought it up again 15 minutes later, I gave in just to shut him up.
New York Times (Aug 23, 2012)
paltry

contemptibly small in amount or size

No following can be more productive of a study and love of word derivations and allied word meanings than gardening.
Alice Morse Earle
menial

relating to unskilled work, especially domestic work

But Mrs Shaw’s condition deteriorated and the booking was cancelled in early May.
BBC (Jul 25, 2013)
venerable

profoundly honored

It is governed by the assumptions of a deterministic, predictable world and focused on centralization, coercion, formality, tight rein, imposed discipline and obedience.
Forbes (Dec 11, 2012)
salubrious

promoting health

Self-censorship — Doubts and deviations from the perceived group consensus are not expressed.
Washington Post (Jun 9, 2012)
prodigious

great in size, force, extent, or degree

Didactic, self-righteous and smug, full of easy slogans, this sort of art leaves people just as boxed in as the systems it supposedly critiques.
New York Times (Jan 9, 2012)
expedite

process fast and efficiently

The novel’s five sections are strictly differentiated by tense, point of view and style.
The Guardian (Jul 27, 2013)
expedite

process fast and efficiently

That would not please the base, but in today’s bitterly divisive politics, a bit more diffidence could go a long way.
Economist (Sep 27, 2012)
celerity

a rate that is rapid

Also, Democrats tend to congregate in the same districts, while Republicans are more diffuse.
New York Times (Jan 28, 2013)
usurp

seize and take control without authority

Some observers warn that popular disaffection may discredit all major political parties, eroding faith in the state itself.
Time (Aug 23, 2010)
succinct

briefly giving the gist of something

“After all this while I had given up every expectation of seeing you again,” he said in a curt manner that betrayed his disapprobation.
F.E. Mills Young
succinct

briefly giving the gist of something

In Thatcher’s case, Harris thought he discerned “a kind of megalomaniacal glint in the eye.”
Newsweek (Apr 8, 2013)
facetious

cleverly amusing in tone

Meanwhile, one disgruntled employee in New York hacked into and corrupted his former employer’s network, causing approximately $90,000 in damages.
Forbes (Jul 12, 2013)
rabid

marked by excessive enthusiasm for a cause or idea

As factories automate, huge Asian economies originally built around cheap human labor—China and India in particular—are likely to suffer from even greater dislocations.
Newsweek (Feb 5, 2013)
rabid

marked by excessive enthusiasm for a cause or idea

After some teething issues, future incarnations will be more ambitious, cut down on red tape, and align disparate rules, a commission spokesman says.
Science Magazine (Jul 12, 2013)
rabid

marked by excessive enthusiasm for a cause or idea

However, unlike the current emotional debate surrounding gun control in the United States, the Swiss approach is more dispassionate and pragmatic.
Time (Mar 4, 2013)
fission

reproduction of a unicellular organism by cell division

There is a disquieting sense of lives being lost in real time.
New York Times (Jun 18, 2013)
fission

reproduction of a unicellular organism by cell division

Video, filmed by an onlooker, was quickly picked up by news organizations and disseminated on social media.
Time (May 24, 2013)
fission

reproduction of a unicellular organism by cell division

The singer’s wife had filed for dissolution of marriage in September last year, according to San Diego Superior Court documents.
BBC (May 8, 2013)
fulminate

cause to explode violently and with loud noise

Regarded as one of the world’s most successful and influential architects, Lord Rogers’ distinctive, eye-catching creations can be seen far and wide.
BBC (Jul 22, 2013)
fulminate

cause to explode violently and with loud noise

Meanwhile, consumers are downright giddy, sharpening the divergence with gloomy corporations.
BusinessWeek (Oct 26, 2012)
facetious

cleverly amusing in tone

In order to sidestep the tighter security presence in Maiduguri, the Islamist militants have diversified their tactics.
BBC (Jul 23, 2013)
fracas

noisy quarrel

His critics, generally dogmatic religious types, are merely one-dimensional villains.
New York Times (Aug 15, 2012)
fresco

a mural done with watercolors on wet plaster

While the group failed to locate a nest – hives are dwellings for domesticated honeybees – they identified and photographed at least three queens.
Reuters (Jul 19, 2013)
froward

habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition

Tommy Eye was doing most of the talking, and it was plain that his opinions carried weight, for no one presumed to gainsay him.
Holman Day
mollify

cause to be more favorably inclined

There are opportunities galore in this new world, but Adams also highlights some of the threats.
Nature (May 29, 2013)
motley

consisting of a haphazard assortment of different kinds

In the more open spaces jugglers and mountebanks, usually accompanied by performing animals, went through all sorts of gambols and antics.
Lewis Spence
rue

feel sorry for; be contrite about

The projects granted funding this week run the gamut from cutting edge research efforts to decidedly low-tech enterprises.
Washington Post (Nov 23, 2012)
salutary

tending to promote physical well-being; beneficial to health

Two gargantuan steam boilers fitted outside were connected to 13 cookers through pipes that ran across the roof of the kitchen.
New York Times (Jul 24, 2013)
rubric

category name

Yes, these garrulous Russians are on occasion willing to shut up, most memorably at dinner while listening to a piece of prerevolutionary church music.
New York Times (May 6, 2013)
riposte

a counterattack made immediately after successfully parrying

Hail, Gastronome, Apostle of Excess, Well skilled to overeat without distress!
Ambrose Bierce
ruse

a deceptive maneuver, especially to avoid capture

In another year he would doubtless lose all his gawkiness and become quite a gallant.
Émile Zola
salacious

suggestive of or tending to moral looseness

Suddenly we are there, in this empty gallery, on a freezing morning, watching this man dust antiquities in the gelid, vodka light.
The Guardian (Mar 24, 2010)
reverent

feeling or showing profound respect or veneration

But Labour has accused the Conservatives of ” gerrymandering” – manipulating constituencies in order to achieve electoral advantage.
BBC (Jan 29, 2013)
urbane

showing a high degree of refinement

Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich was gracious in defeat, saying Miami deserved their win.
Reuters (Jun 21, 2013)
latent

potentially existing but not presently evident or realized

Presidents and prime ministers in the West have made grandiloquent speeches about making poverty history for fifty years.
Economist (Jun 2, 2013)
tortuous

marked by repeated turns and bends

The gravid female always retains an upright position at this time, as indeed she does at other times.
Bernard Miall
misogynist

a misanthrope who dislikes women in particular

But rather than old-fashioned witless xenophobia, his material is rooted in keen observational humour, which swaps hackneyed cliche for fresh insights.
The Guardian (Apr 13, 2013)
amenable

disposed or willing to comply

It began with two young women, each embarking on marriage in the halcyon days at the end of World War II.
Salon (Jul 15, 2012)
promulgate

state or announce

British success on the hallowed turf of Wimbledon can bring untold rewards.
BBC (Jun 23, 2012)
scurrilous

expressing offensive reproach

Full-blown zombification takes place mere seconds after a hapless victim is fatally chomped.
Seattle Times (Jun 19, 2013)
aspirant

an ambitious young person

He appears daily on television to harangue opponents and inaugurate public works, paying homage to his boss at every turn.
Reuters (Mar 1, 2013)
belligerent

characteristic of an enemy or one eager to fight

Other reasons included managers not checking what they were being told by sales staff, and a failure to heed warning signs going back several years.
BBC (May 10, 2013)
frenzy

state of violent mental agitation

Though ubiquity and flexibility may give English hegemony, Twitter is also helping smaller and struggling languages.
Economist (Mar 29, 2012)
frenzy

state of violent mental agitation

Four people responsible for “this heinous, vicious, cruel crime” were recently apprehended and charged with robbery, assault and other crimes, Booker said.
Reuters (Feb 13, 2013)
profligate

unrestrained by convention or morality

“They’re enclosed spaces, hermetic worlds,” Mr. Rivers, 40, said recently of the environments in his films.
New York Times (Oct 7, 2012)
profligate

unrestrained by convention or morality

Navratilova says she recently began running again after a hiatus.
Washington Post (Jun 24, 2013)
sumptuous

rich and superior in quality

He said his predecessors had given Lockheed too much leeway earlier, when government oversight was considered “a hindrance more than a help
New York Times (Nov 28, 2012)
parsimonious

excessively unwilling to spend

Dudes With Beards Eating Cupcakes Photographic evidence that hirsute gentlemen enjoy dainty patisserie
The Guardian (Nov 19, 2010)
strife

bitter conflict; heated often violent dissension

Gone are the narrative histrionics and set pieces that have come to define the Gears campaign, replaced with something subtler.
The Guardian (Mar 23, 2013)
denigrate

charge falsely or with malicious intent

Even the hoary Voyager 1 space probe, whose official mission ended three decades ago, is making news simply by leaving the building.
Time (Dec 6, 2012)
demotic

of or for the common people

I remember hearing a sermon just before Purim, in Vienna, and the Jewish preacher gave an admirable homiletic explanation of this rule.
Israel Abrahams
goad

stab or urge on as if with a pointed stick

But low-skilled and humdrum jobs, particularly in manufacturing, have gone overseas, or fallen victim to automation.
Economist (Nov 8, 2012)
gainsay

take exception to

You’re going to learn a lot more useful information from taking action rather than hypothesizing.
Inc(Aug 13, 2012)
geniality

a disposition to be friendly and approachable

Steadfast in his convictions and imperturbable under pressure, Mr. Miller was the ultimate iconoclast.
Wall Street Journal (Nov 18, 2011)
gauche

lacking social polish

Beyond espionage, any public figure who combines grandiose ambition, perceived malign purpose and memorable idiosyncrasy will eventually be likened to a “Bond villain”.
The Guardian (Sep 28, 2012)
gossamer

a gauze fabric with an extremely fine texture

My creditors, whose insulting illiberality could only be equalled by their unbounded impositions, hourly assailed me.
Mary Robinson
garrulous

full of trivial conversation

The findings from this group illuminate the profound ways that dairy products have shaped human settlement on the continent.
Nature (Jul 31, 2013)
gouge

an impression in a surface, as made by a blow

Schoenberg died in 1951, 17 years after having immigrated to the United States, and his study at home in Brentwood, Calif., remained intact.
New York Times (Oct 10, 2012)
glib

artfully persuasive in speech

He said his departure was imminent: he had bought a ticket to Accra leaving on Aug. 15.
New York Times (Jul 19, 2013)
negate

make ineffective by counterbalancing the effect of

Political prisoners, numbering as many as three or four hundred at a time, have been immured within its massive walls.
Mary Stuart Boyd
negate

make ineffective by counterbalancing the effect of

So maybe death and taxes are no longer certain, but one thing remains as immutable as the hills.
Salon (May 9, 2011)
neophyte

any new participant in some activity

Gradually, almost imperceptibly, our material environment gets better, smarter and lighter.
The Guardian (Feb 17, 2011)
nostrum

patent medicine whose efficacy is questionable

Both have a headlong exuberance, are filled with caustic satire and ultimately show impetuous romance giving way to hard-headed realism.
The Guardian (Nov 22, 2012)
neologism

a newly invented word or phrase

As Singapore has shown, implementing such plans on a widespread scale can dramatically enhance wealth.
Forbes (Jul 31, 2013)
amnesty

a warrant granting release from punishment for an offense

His wife turned a cut-rate apartment in affluent Cambridge into an improvised salon, offering facials at attractive prices.
Washington Post (Jul 17, 2013)
amnesty

a warrant granting release from punishment for an offense

“Company stock was an imprudent, inappropriate and exceedingly risky investment.”
BusinessWeek (Mar 17, 2011)
pecuniary

relating to or involving money

Since the crisis began, Ireland changed regulations to increase the incentives for domestic pension funds to buy Irish government bonds.
Wall Street Journal (Jul 11, 2013)
denizen

a plant or animal naturalized in a region

In this season the two things are incongruous, a skeletal figure wearing the tunic of an obese pastry chef.
The New Yorker (Sep 17, 2012)
abundance

the property of a more than adequate quantity or supply

He, apparently, saw nothing indecorous in facts which must shock any other than the most depraved.
Anonymous
accessibility

the attribute of being easy to meet or deal with

Mr. Charles Fox took care to offer only such arrangement as should indemnify him from all risk in the undertaking.
Florence Fenwick Miller
accord

a written agreement between two states or sovereigns

Yet, strange to say, I was not alarmed, but passively indifferent.
Edward Pollock Anshutz
acerbic

harsh or corrosive in tone

The nascent republic — made up mostly of indigenous Malays, and Chinese, Indian and Tamil immigrants — was not unified by language, history or religion.
Nature (May 15, 2013)
adaptive

having a capacity for change

If there is any pressing going on, it’s indiscernible to the naked eye.
The Guardian (Aug 25, 2010)
adequate

having the requisite qualities or resources to meet a task

Analysis of teeth found at archaeological sites, therefore, could help researchers infer demographic information about ancient populations.
Scientific American (May 22, 2013)
adjacent

having a common boundary or edge

Defense attorneys will argue that brain trauma inhibited Russell’s judgment.
Reuters (May 6, 2013)
admonish

warn strongly; put on guard

Nutritionists know that crash dieting is inimical to healthy eating in the long run.
The Guardian (May 20, 2012)
adverse

contrary to your interests or welfare

Malzin lost his head, and made many injudicious concessions.
Ossip Schubin
aesthetics

the branch of philosophy dealing with beauty and taste

But both countries have a deeper intractable challenge that will, in the longer-term, get worse.
Reuters (Jul 3, 2013)
affable

diffusing warmth and friendliness

While some back-channel communications continued on Monday, each side sought to publicly portray the other as intransigent.
New York Times (Mar 28, 2011)
affect

have an influence upon

“ Intrinsic motivation will be far more enduring than external incentives.”
New York Times (Sep 18, 2012)
aloof

remote in manner

In recent years, courts have invalidated mayoral elections in Illinois and Indiana because of fraudulent absentee ballots.
New York Times (Oct 7, 2012)
ambiguity

unclearness by virtue of having more than one meaning

We, too, were somewhat tired; but the glorious sight that burst upon us, bathed our spirits afresh in the waters of invigoration.
Various
ameliorate

make better

While some entrepreneurs may have stronger attributes than others, none are infallible.
ample

more than enough in size or scope or capacity

Hogan’s clear, resonant voice, his keen alertness and confident bearing radiate strength and determination.
Seattle Times (Jul 19, 2013)
anachronistic

chronologically misplaced

Burying beetles – also known as sexton beetles – prepare and bury animal carcasses, which they use for breeding, laying eggs and rearing larvae.
BBC (Jun 18, 2013)
analogous

similar or equivalent in some respects

An enfeebling spell seemed to have been taken off his mind; and the lassitude of doubt and indecision was gone.
G. P. R. (George Payne Rainsford) James
anomaly

deviation from the normal or common order or form or rule

It also gave many employees, Snowden included, too much latitude to access records.
Washington Post (Jul 18, 2013)
antedate

be earlier in time; go back further

Boats in India are often overloaded, and lax safety standards mean accidents are common on the river.
BBC (Jul 12, 2013)
antithetical

sharply contrasted in character or purpose

Lionized in American history for his soaring defense of individual liberty, Jefferson’s extensive slaveholdings have been curiously downplayed, dismissed as beyond his control, or excused.
Seattle Times (Oct 28, 2012)
apathy

an absence of emotion or enthusiasm

Greater competition means mattress sellers are having to adapt to lure and keep customers — with tactics like price matching, zero percent financing and same-day delivery.
Chicago Tribune (Jul 21, 2013)
apparent

clearly revealed to the mind or the senses or judgment

Like many of Khan’s supporters, he’s wearied by Pakistan’s crippling energy shortages, long-souring economy, near daily terrorist attacks and lurid tales of official corruption.
Time (May 10, 2013)
arbitrary

based on or subject to individual discretion or preference

Admissions boards can seem capricious and impenetrable, if not malignant, to many prospective freshmen.
New York Times (Feb 2, 2012)
arduous

characterized by effort to the point of exhaustion

Steven Spielberg, fantast supreme, always felt manacled by movie reality.
Time (Dec 21, 2011)
ascertain

learn or discover with confidence

On the one hand, it’s great to hear that people are listening and taking steps to prevent marginalization of women.
Forbes (Mar 22, 2013)
assent

agree or express agreement

As these videos suggest, scientists are taking tiny, incremental steps toward melding humans and machine all the time.
New York Times (Jun 1, 2013)
astounding

bewildering or striking dumb with wonder

It is also used to treat metabolic syndrome, a combination of diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.
BBC (Jul 30, 2013)
attenuate

become weaker, in strength, value, or magnitude

However, different studies define food deserts and relevant populations differently, so differences in methodology can yield two completely different results.
Scientific American (May 28, 2013)
austerity

self-denial, especially refraining from worldly pleasures

The robbery was marked by meticulous planning, inside information and swift execution — 8 armed men in 11 minutes — that left investigators marveling.
New York Times (Jun 15, 2013)
banish

send away from a place of residence, as for punishment

Social problems typical of Central Asia today, like abuse of heroin smuggled from Afghanistan, labor migration and growing Islamic fundamentalism, are creeping into the city.
New York Times (Jun 18, 2013)
belie

be in contradiction with

But that’s a misnomer – reindeer moss is in fact lichen.
The Guardian (Dec 22, 2012)
benign

pleasant and beneficial in nature or influence

He talks much in an animated monologue, though the common complaint that he monopolizes the conversation is not a just one.
Various
bogus

fraudulent; having a misleading appearance

Seders were built around rigid scripts, resulting in monotonous hours of guests taking turns reading flat passages about plagues and freed slaves.
Washington Post (Mar 24, 2013)
bolster

support and strengthen

Terry looked as if he would far rather have his soul damned under a Gothic nave.—”That’s simply buying ’em off,” he said.
Oliver Onions
brandish

move or swing back and forth

His parents, who belong to a Punjabi nomadic tribe and live in temporary, thatched shelters, have moved to other grounds.
BBC (Jul 24, 2013)
bridle

the act of restraining power or action or limiting excess

Although he sometimes bristled at his Watergate notoriety, Mr. Garment professed no lasting scars from the episode, the biggest political scandal of the century.
New York Times (Jul 15, 2013)
buttress

a support usually of stone or brick

Other researchers are working on novel approaches such as genetically modifying mosquitoes so they can’t harbor parasites.
Scientific American (Jul 29, 2013)
capricious

determined by chance or impulse rather than by necessity

The new downtown productions, by embedding theater inside a larger experience, have so far been able to persuade many people to pony up for novelty.
New York Times (Jun 23, 2013)
catastrophe

an event resulting in great loss and misfortune

Recognising things aren’t black and white means recognising nuance.
The Guardian (Jul 25, 2013)
cerebral

involving intelligence rather than emotions or instinct

As the hard, stiff, corded muscle shrivelled, so shrivelled his obdurate, persistent self-confidence.
Marcus Dods
chevron

an inverted V-shaped charge

But outside trading floors, business schools, banks and brokerage firms, bond dynamics are fairly obscure, surveys find.
New York Times (Jul 20, 2013)
chronological

relating to or arranged according to temporal order

Maybe your obsequious staff laughing at your every quip makes you think you are hilarious.
The Guardian (Jul 16, 2013)
circumscribe

restrict or confine

They imply sadly that business schools are likely to go on teaching this now obsolete idea, even though the world outside has moved on.
Forbes (Jul 9, 2013)
clarify

make clear and comprehensible

Germany is advocating a reduction in budget deficits while pursuing an orthodox monetary policy whose sole objective is to control inflation.
The Guardian (Apr 30, 2013)
coinage

a newly invented word or phrase

Hogan’s clear, resonant voice, his keen alertness and confident bearing radiate strength and determination.
Seattle Times (Jul 19, 2013)
complacency

the feeling you have when you are satisfied with yourself

Burying beetles – also known as sexton beetles – prepare and bury animal carcasses, which they use for breeding, laying eggs and rearing larvae.
BBC (Jun 18, 2013)
compliance

acting according to certain accepted standards

An enfeebling spell seemed to have been taken off his mind; and the lassitude of doubt and indecision was gone.
G. P. R. (George Payne Rainsford) James
condone

excuse, overlook, or make allowances for

It also gave many employees, Snowden included, too much latitude to access records.
Washington Post (Jul 18, 2013)
consensus

agreement in the judgment reached by a group as a whole

Boats in India are often overloaded, and lax safety standards mean accidents are common on the river.
BBC (Jul 12, 2013)
consolidation

the act of combining into an integral whole

Lionized in American history for his soaring defense of individual liberty, Jefferson’s extensive slaveholdings have been curiously downplayed, dismissed as beyond his control, or excused.
Seattle Times (Oct 28, 2012)
conspicuous

without any attempt at concealment; completely obvious

Greater competition means mattress sellers are having to adapt to lure and keep customers — with tactics like price matching, zero percent financing and same-day delivery.
Chicago Tribune (Jul 21, 2013)
constitute

compose or represent

Like many of Khan’s supporters, he’s wearied by Pakistan’s crippling energy shortages, long-souring economy, near daily terrorist attacks and lurid tales of official corruption.
Time (May 10, 2013)
conventional

following accepted customs and proprieties

Admissions boards can seem capricious and impenetrable, if not malignant, to many prospective freshmen.
New York Times (Feb 2, 2012)
copious

large in number or quantity

Steven Spielberg, fantast supreme, always felt manacled by movie reality.
Time (Dec 21, 2011)
corroborate

support with evidence or authority or make more certain

On the one hand, it’s great to hear that people are listening and taking steps to prevent marginalization of women.
Forbes (Mar 22, 2013)
crestfallen

brought low in spirit

As these videos suggest, scientists are taking tiny, incremental steps toward melding humans and machine all the time.
New York Times (Jun 1, 2013)
crude

conspicuously and tastelessly indecent

It is also used to treat metabolic syndrome, a combination of diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.
BBC (Jul 30, 2013)
curtail

terminate or abbreviate before its intended or proper end

However, different studies define food deserts and relevant populations differently, so differences in methodology can yield two completely different results.
Scientific American (May 28, 2013)
cynicism

a pessimistic feeling of distrust

The robbery was marked by meticulous planning, inside information and swift execution — 8 armed men in 11 minutes — that left investigators marveling.
New York Times (Jun 15, 2013)
debunk

expose while ridiculing

Social problems typical of Central Asia today, like abuse of heroin smuggled from Afghanistan, labor migration and growing Islamic fundamentalism, are creeping into the city.
New York Times (Jun 18, 2013)
deflect

draw someone’s attention away from something

But that’s a misnomer – reindeer moss is in fact lichen.
The Guardian (Dec 22, 2012)
defy

resist or confront with resistance

He talks much in an animated monologue, though the common complaint that he monopolizes the conversation is not a just one.
Various
degrade

reduce in worth or character, usually verbally

Seders were built around rigid scripts, resulting in monotonous hours of guests taking turns reading flat passages about plagues and freed slaves.
Washington Post (Mar 24, 2013)
deliberate

carefully thought out in advance

Terry looked as if he would far rather have his soul damned under a Gothic nave.—”That’s simply buying ’em off,” he said.
Oliver Onions
delineate

represented accurately or precisely

His parents, who belong to a Punjabi nomadic tribe and live in temporary, thatched shelters, have moved to other grounds.
BBC (Jul 24, 2013)
demur

politely refuse or take exception to

Although he sometimes bristled at his Watergate notoriety, Mr. Garment professed no lasting scars from the episode, the biggest political scandal of the century.
New York Times (Jul 15, 2013)
derivation

the act of obtaining something from a source or origin

Other researchers are working on novel approaches such as genetically modifying mosquitoes so they can’t harbor parasites.
Scientific American (Jul 29, 2013)
deteriorate

become worse or disintegrate

The new downtown productions, by embedding theater inside a larger experience, have so far been able to persuade many people to pony up for novelty.
New York Times (Jun 23, 2013)
deterministic

an inevitable consequence of antecedent sufficient causes

Recognising things aren’t black and white means recognising nuance.
The Guardian (Jul 25, 2013)
deviation

a variation from the standard or norm

As the hard, stiff, corded muscle shrivelled, so shrivelled his obdurate, persistent self-confidence.
Marcus Dods
didactic

instructive, especially excessively

But outside trading floors, business schools, banks and brokerage firms, bond dynamics are fairly obscure, surveys find.
New York Times (Jul 20, 2013)
differentiate

mark as distinct

Maybe your obsequious staff laughing at your every quip makes you think you are hilarious.
The Guardian (Jul 16, 2013)
diffidence

lack of self-assurance

They imply sadly that business schools are likely to go on teaching this now obsolete idea, even though the world outside has moved on.
Forbes (Jul 9, 2013)
diffuse

spread out; not concentrated in one place

Germany is advocating a reduction in budget deficits while pursuing an orthodox monetary policy whose sole objective is to control inflation.
The Guardian (Apr 30, 2013)
disaffection

the feeling of being alienated from other people

In one insouciant swipe, racism symbolically undone with wit, skill and panache, the banana no longer carried any terrible politica potency.T
The Guardian (Mar 28, 2011)
disapprobation

pronouncing as wrong or morally culpable

Meanwhile, a major paradigm shift is occurring, whereby white men from Western Europe and North America are no longer calling all the shots.
New York Times (Jun 29, 2013)
discern

detect with the senses

“We saw many translucent streams, whose pellucid waters were charming to behold.
C. G. (Carl Gustaf) Helleberg
disgruntled

in a state of sulky dissatisfaction

Then her cheek burned with shame, and penitent tears filled her eyes, as better thoughts came crowding into her mind.
Martha Finley
dislocation

the act of disrupting an established order so it fails to continue

Italy’s longest-serving prime minister is known for irrepressible off-color humor, his facelifts, perennial tan, make-up and hair weave.
Reuters (Aug 1, 2013)
disparate

including markedly dissimilar elements

Directors have called Mr. Loeb’s candidates, but the interviews were interpreted as brief and perfunctory, according to people close to Mr. Loeb.
New York Times (Mar 8, 2012)
dispassionate

unaffected by strong emotion or prejudice

In business, project managers sometimes get mired in peripheral issues.
Forbes (Jul 16, 2013)
disquieting

causing mental discomfort

His films, which combined archival footage, still photographs and fresh interviews, were triumphs of curiosity and persistence in unearthing lost material about forgotten subjects.
New York Times (May 18, 2013)
disseminate

cause to become widely known

As we are hastily reading books and papers we continually come across maxims, epigrams, and short, pithy sayings that attract us.
Louis Philippe McCarty
dissolution

the termination or disintegration of a relationship

His smooth, placid demeanor is perfect here, which make the few times he does snap seem that much more startling.
Seattle Times (Sep 11, 2012)
distinctive

of a feature that helps to identify a person or thing

But even here Kushner’s polemical fury at the Iraq invasion is qualified by his residual sympathy for Mrs Bush.
The Guardian (Sep 6, 2010)
divergence

a difference between conflicting facts or claims or opinions

A third suspect who died in jail was given a posthumous conviction.
BBC (Jun 18, 2012)
diversify

make more varied

On two occasions when I crossed the beaches the sea was running too heavily to make bathing practicable.
Samuel Adams Drake
dogmatic

pertaining to a code of beliefs accepted as authoritative

Pragmatism surely explains some of this surge: participants frustrated by stagnant multilateral talks are anxious to do deals where they can.
Economist (Mar 14, 2013)
dwelling

housing that someone is living in

One moment, Mr. Gates was precariously perched on the jetty; the next, he had vanished behind a wall of water.
New York Times (Apr 28, 2013)
gainsay

take exception to

“Political choices have become predominant over monetary policy instruments,” he said.
BBC (Jun 15, 2012)
galore

existing in abundance

He denied the killing was premeditated, but said Arias snapped in the “sudden heat of passion” after Alexander attacked her.
Reuters (May 6, 2013)
gambol

play or run boisterously

Though still radiating preternatural cuteness, Witherspoon is no longer so attractive at the box office .
Time (Feb 20, 2012)
gamut

a complete extent or range

At the Nike outlet, Chung said all sales staff were now required to be fluent in Mandarin, the most prevalent Chinese dialect.
Reuters (May 19, 2013)
gargantuan

of great mass; huge and bulky

Secret Service agents are also drilled almost from Day One on the need for probity, discretion and solid morals.
Chicago Tribune (Apr 21, 2012)
garrulous

full of trivial conversation

Drink, gambling, licentiousness, and prodigality, ruined his fortunes, and cut short his life.
H. G. Somerville
gastronome

a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment

“Then the government is doing all this profligate spending and unethical things.
Slate (Feb 25, 2013)
gawkiness

the carriage of someone whose movements and posture are extremely ungainly and inelegant

Mr. Zapruder’s verse — a learned, attentive everyman’s train of thought — couches subtle profundities among mundane observations.
New York Times (Oct 28, 2012)
gelid

extremely cold

His prolixity was increased by his unwillingness, when writing without prescribed limits, to leave out any detail, however unimportant.
Various
gerrymander

divide voting districts unfairly and to one’s advantage

Though they garner far less publicity than splashy initial public offerings, private placements play as prominent a role in the financial markets.
New York Times (Jul 10, 2013)
gracious

exhibiting courtesy and politeness

The piece feels strangely prophetic, anticipating an eclipse of the news outlets themselves.
New York Times (Jan 20, 2011)
grandiloquent

lofty in style

The solutions are many and various, mostly boring and prosaic—and not frightening.
Slate (Jun 28, 2013)
gravid

in an advanced stage of pregnancy

The oldest sailors on board acknowledged that they had never witnessed so providential an escape.
George Henry Borrow
hackneyed

repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse

These two schools are very close in geographic proximity, but their cultures are worlds apart.
Forbes (Aug 1, 2013)
halcyon

idyllically calm and peaceful; suggesting happy tranquility

JK Rowling has said she feels “very angry” after finding out her pseudonym Robert Galbraith was leaked by a legal firm.
BBC (Jul 18, 2013)
hallowed

worthy of religious veneration

That’s a quixotic task at best, intended to illustrate possible outcomes rather than to provide precise forecasts, said Mr. Masters at Bernstein.
New York Times (Jun 8, 2013)
hapless

unfortunate and deserving pity

In reality, reconciling Islamist theories with an economy perilously close to collapse has been difficult.
New York Times (May 2, 2013)
harangue

a loud bombastic declamation expressed with strong emotion

Such data is difficult to purge. As quickly as employees create content, corporate technology teams routinely make redundant backup copies.
Forbes (Jul 30, 2013)
heed

careful attention

Adam and Eve are not about blood-sucking and murder – but refined lovers of literature, science, music and learning in general.
Seattle Times (May 25, 2013)
hegemony

the dominance or leadership of one social group over others

“This shows why we need to review and rein in unfair town hall parking rules,” he said.
BBC (Jul 31, 2013)
heinous

extremely wicked, deeply criminal

Last week, two police officers told me several colleagues were in heavily attended remedial classes for those who fail to record enough stops and arrests.
New York Times (May 28, 2012)
hermetic

completely sealed or airtight

Never in my years has any president been so determined and resolute and outspoken on this subject.
Washington Post (Feb 21, 2013)
hiatus

an interruption in the intensity or amount of something

The delegates got so restive as he droned on – the phrase commentators used – that they actually cheered at the words “in closing.”
New York Times (Sep 4, 2012)
hindrance

any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome

But reverence has long since gone out of fashion, having been replaced in our culture by a pervasive ironic distance.
Slate (Apr 15, 2013)
hirsute

having or covered with hair

Facebook’s robust earnings numbers propelled company shares as much as 20% higher, and they’ve been going up ever since.
Time (Jul 31, 2013)
histrionic

characteristic of acting or a stage performance

Japan is embroiled in a bitter row over islands with China and is deeply concerned by North Korea’s nuclear ambitions.
BBC (Jul 26, 2013)
hoary

having gray or white hair as with age

And talk of shutting down the government – let alone actually going through with it – has proven counterproductive, even ruinous, to Republicans in the past.
Reuters (Jan 15, 2013)
homiletic

of the nature of a homily or sermon

Like many an American road trip, the journey creates its own metaphor, familiar locales triggering memories and ruminations of years past.
Seattle Times (May 23, 2012)
humdrum

tediously repetitious or lacking in variety

Sartorially, he favors unflashy suits and wiry John Lennon–style glasses.
Newsweek (Apr 29, 2013)
hypothesize

believe especially on uncertain or tentative grounds

Reading these scant pages – I wish the curators had included more – is fascinating, but unsettling too.
The Guardian (Jul 13, 2013)
iconoclast

someone who attacks cherished ideas or institutions

In a scathing dissent joined by one other colleague, Judge Denny Chin declared Aereo to be a “sham” designed to circumvent U.S. copyright law.
Time (Jul 17, 2013)
idiosyncrasy

a behavioral attribute peculiar to an individual

Rebel forces, drawn largely from Syria’s Sunni majority, are far from united, with schisms along religious, geographic, political and economic lines.
Washington Post February 10, 2013
illiberality

a disposition not to be liberal (generous) with money

Through the years Ms. Raitt has been a scrupulous musician with a conscience, supporting human rights, feminist and environmental causes and playing countless benefit concerts.
New York Times (Mar 30, 2012)
illuminate

make free from confusion or ambiguity

The whole edifice depends on tax havens and the webs of shell companies, artificial entities, fake transactions and sham trusts.
The Guardian (Jun 16, 2013)
immigrate

come into a new country and change residency

This shifting, mercurial work, alive with gurgling rhythmic figures and skittish violin bursts, was inspired by three Chagall paintings of Old Testament subjects.
New York Times (Jun 12, 2012)
imminent

close in time; about to occur

While anti-anarchist laws were sporadically enforced at first, they kicked in for real after the Russian Revolution.
Salon (Apr 27, 2013)
immure

lock up or confine, in or as in a jail

His own static paintings look cramped in comparison to his animated work, and very much of their time.
The Guardian (Jan 9, 2013)
immutable

not subject or susceptible to change or variation

He also says the way Japanese stigmatize failure prevents people from taking risks and starting up new firms.
Time (Oct 21, 2012)
imperceptibly

in a manner that is difficult to discern

It is also stunning how little thought society has given to raising kids with two working parents.
Scientific American (Jul 21, 2013)
impetuous

characterized by undue haste and lack of thought

Food aversions are generally subjective, but there are definitely trends in unpopular textures.
The Guardian (Jul 2, 2013)
implement

pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue

However, most keepers are able to pick up on subtle hints that might indicate an animal isn’t feeling well.
Scientific American (Jul 18, 2013)
improvise

manage in a makeshift way; do with whatever is at hand

These characters, led by rebel extraordinaire Guy Debord, were dead set on cultural subversion, changing the world through art and ideas.
BBC (Mar 2, 2011)
imprudent

lacking wise self-restraint

A marked tendency in the new movements is to throw overboard superfluous technical baggage.
James Huneker
incentive

a positive motivational influence

Both measures surpassed previous record highs hit in late May.
BBC (Jul 11, 2013)
incongruous

lacking in harmony or compatibility or appropriateness

The first three Gospels are usually called the Synoptic Gospels, because they give us one synopsis or common view of our Lord’s work.
Leighton Pullan
indecorous

lacking propriety and good taste in manners and conduct

That’s a quixotic task at best, intended to illustrate possible outcomes rather than to provide precise forecasts, said Mr. Masters at Bernstein.
New York Times (Jun 8, 2013)
indemnify

secure against future loss, damage, or liability

In reality, reconciling Islamist theories with an economy perilously close to collapse has been difficult.
New York Times (May 2, 2013)
indifferent

marked by a lack of interest

Such data is difficult to purge. As quickly as employees create content, corporate technology teams routinely make redundant backup copies.
Forbes (Jul 30, 2013)
indigenous

originating where it is found

Adam and Eve are not about blood-sucking and murder – but refined lovers of literature, science, music and learning in general.
Seattle Times (May 25, 2013)
indiscernible

difficult or impossible to perceive

“This shows why we need to review and rein in unfair town hall parking rules,” he said.
BBC (Jul 31, 2013)
infer

reason by deduction; establish by deduction

Last week, two police officers told me several colleagues were in heavily attended remedial classes for those who fail to record enough stops and arrests.
New York Times (May 28, 2012)
inhibit

limit, block, or decrease the action or function of

Never in my years has any president been so determined and resolute and outspoken on this subject.
Washington Post (Feb 21, 2013)
inimical

not friendly

The delegates got so restive as he droned on – the phrase commentators used – that they actually cheered at the words “in closing.”
New York Times (Sep 4, 2012)
injudicious

lacking or showing lack of judgment or discretion; unwise

But reverence has long since gone out of fashion, having been replaced in our culture by a pervasive ironic distance.
Slate (Apr 15, 2013)
intractable

difficult to manage or mold

Facebook’s robust earnings numbers propelled company shares as much as 20% higher, and they’ve been going up ever since.
Time (Jul 31, 2013)
intransigent

impervious to pleas, persuasion, requests, or reason

Japan is embroiled in a bitter row over islands with China and is deeply concerned by North Korea’s nuclear ambitions.
BBC (Jul 26, 2013)
intrinsic

belonging to a thing by its very nature

And talk of shutting down the government – let alone actually going through with it – has proven counterproductive, even ruinous, to Republicans in the past.
Reuters (Jan 15, 2013)
invalidated

deprived of legal force

Like many an American road trip, the journey creates its own metaphor, familiar locales triggering memories and ruminations of years past.
Seattle Times (May 23, 2012)
invigoration

quality of being active or spirited or alive and vigorous

Sartorially, he favors unflashy suits and wiry John Lennon–style glasses.
Newsweek (Apr 29, 2013)
infallible

incapable of failure or error

Reading these scant pages – I wish the curators had included more – is fascinating, but unsettling too.
The Guardian (Jul 13, 2013)
keen

intense or sharp

In a scathing dissent joined by one other colleague, Judge Denny Chin declared Aereo to be a “sham” designed to circumvent U.S. copyright law.
Time (Jul 17, 2013)
larva

the immature free-living form of most invertebrates and amphibians and fish which at hatching from the egg is fundamentally unlike its parent and must metamorphose

Rebel forces, drawn largely from Syria’s Sunni majority, are far from united, with schisms along religious, geographic, political and economic lines.
Washington Post February 10, 2013
lassitude

a feeling of lack of interest or energy

Through the years Ms. Raitt has been a scrupulous musician with a conscience, supporting human rights, feminist and environmental causes and playing countless benefit concerts.
New York Times (Mar 30, 2012)
latitude

freedom from normal restraints in conduct

The whole edifice depends on tax havens and the webs of shell companies, artificial entities, fake transactions and sham trusts.
The Guardian (Jun 16, 2013)
lax

without rigor or strictness

This shifting, mercurial work, alive with gurgling rhythmic figures and skittish violin bursts, was inspired by three Chagall paintings of Old Testament subjects.
New York Times (Jun 12, 2012)
lionize

assign great social importance to

While anti-anarchist laws were sporadically enforced at first, they kicked in for real after the Russian Revolution.
Salon (Apr 27, 2013)
lure

provoke someone to do something through persuasion

His own static paintings look cramped in comparison to his animated work, and very much of their time.
The Guardian (Jan 9, 2013)
lurid

glaringly vivid and graphic; marked by sensationalism

He also says the way Japanese stigmatize failure prevents people from taking risks and starting up new firms.
Time (Oct 21, 2012)
malignant

dangerous to health

It is also stunning how little thought society has given to raising kids with two working parents.
Scientific American (Jul 21, 2013)
manacle

confine or restrain with or as if with handcuffs

Food aversions are generally subjective, but there are definitely trends in unpopular textures.
The Guardian (Jul 2, 2013)
marginalization

the social process of becoming or being made marginal

However, most keepers are able to pick up on subtle hints that might indicate an animal isn’t feeling well.
Scientific American (Jul 18, 2013)
meld

lose its distinct outline or shape; blend gradually

These characters, led by rebel extraordinaire Guy Debord, were dead set on cultural subversion, changing the world through art and ideas.
BBC (Mar 2, 2011)
metabolic

of or relating to metabolism

A marked tendency in the new movements is to throw overboard superfluous technical baggage.
James Huneker
methodology

the techniques followed in a particular discipline

Both measures surpassed previous record highs hit in late May.
BBC (Jul 11, 2013)
meticulous

marked by precise accordance with details

The first three Gospels are usually called the Synoptic Gospels, because they give us one synopsis or common view of our Lord’s work.
Leighton Pullan
migration

the movement of persons from one locality to another

Daniel Day-Lewis also showed up; the normally taciturn actor looked jovial, socializing with tablemates.
New York Times (Apr 24, 2013)
misnomer

an incorrect or unsuitable name

Thus, pride is opposed to humility, gluttony to temperance—two different virtues.

monopolize

have and control fully and exclusively

Mr. Medvedev’s decision comes in a tendentious political context, as Mr. Lukashenko, once the Kremlin’s staunchest regional allies, hangs back from key Russian initiatives.
New York Times (Jun 21, 2010)
monotonous

tediously repetitious or lacking in variety

In a terse statement, the embassy confirmed an “incident,” but gave few details.
Reuters (May 28, 2013)
nave

the central area of a church

Fixlein possessed a more thoroughgoing genius, and had completely mastered the whole enterprise in sixteen days.
Paul Jean
nomadic

migratory

“Thrift means not buying stuff, turning down the heat, not making five trips to town a week,” he said.
New York Times (Dec 1, 2011)
notoriety

the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality

One person’s tranquil small town might make another go stir-crazy, while someone from Texas might shiver just at the thought of moving to Maine.
Time (May 13, 2013)
novel

original and of a kind not seen before

But his writing — supple, vivid, graceful — transcended mere reportage, and his service to aspiring writers was immeasurable.
New York Times (May 21, 2013)
novelty

originality by virtue of being new and surprising

“But even a trifling difference multiplied a million times is big,” he says.
Science Magazine (May 28, 2013)
nuance

a subtle difference in meaning or opinion or attitude

In trendy, eclectic, overexposed Brooklyn as packaged for TV, even the sagacity has turned trite.
New York Times (May 27, 2013)
obdurate

stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing

As tumultuous societal changes transform Bangalore, many young, middle-class Indians are struggling to cope.
New York Times (Aug 13, 2012)
obscure

not clearly understood or expressed

Manning’s body language was more still and observant, hands on hips, surveying, slope shouldered, undemonstrative.
Washington Post (Oct 21, 2012)
obsequious

attempting to win favor from influential people by flattery

The incident, which took place on Tuesday, underscores growing concern that Syria’s more than two-year-old civil war is dragging in neighboring states.
Reuters (Jul 17, 2013)
obsolete

no longer in use

As well as unprecedented ticket sales, media interest has also reached record levels with 705 representatives set to cover the tournament.
BBC (Jul 9, 2013)
orthodox

adhering to what is commonly accepted

It was a raucous evening in which people ended up on strangers’ laps, chanted ribald phrases, found themselves onstage doing unseemly things.
New York Times (Nov 30, 2011)
keen

intense or sharp

Terry Marsh from CEH said: “Rainfall charts show no compelling long-term trend – the annual precipitation table shows lots of variability.”
BBC (Oct 18, 2012)
larva

the immature free-living form of most invertebrates and amphibians and fish which at hatching from the egg is fundamentally unlike its parent and must metamorphose

The leaves had assumed their gorgeous autumnal tints, and the masses of timber, variegated in colour, presented an inexpressibly beautiful appearance.
William Harrison Ainsworth
lassitude

a feeling of lack of interest or energy

Nearly everyone in it is venal, petty, grasping, vicious, bent on serving heaping cold platters of revenge.
New York Times (Sep 28, 2010)
latitude

freedom from normal restraints in conduct

A wander around confirms crystal clear sound throughout, backing up the venue’s claim that there are no bad seats.
The Guardian (Jul 25, 2013)
lax

without rigor or strictness

As with any candidate, you absolutely must make sure the person is a known quantity with a proven, verifiable track record.
Inc (Jun 24, 2013)
lionize

assign great social importance to

Comedians have been viable political voices – both as participants and commentators – for a quite a few years now in the US.
The Guardian (Mar 4, 2013)
lure

provoke someone to do something through persuasion

Butler’s vigorous manner contrasts with laid-back bartender and pub owner Brenden, younger but also still single, given a quietly staunch presence by Billy Carter.
Seattle Times (May 24, 2013)
lurid

glaringly vivid and graphic; marked by sensationalism

Typhoid fever, the enemy which no army can conquer, broke out with distressing virulence, and a considerable number died of disease.
Anonymous
malignant

dangerous to health

Coverley’s walkers are professional outsiders; visionaries and dreamers on the road.
The Guardian (Aug 9, 2012)
manacle

confine or restrain with or as if with handcuffs

His tone towards them is almost always contemptuous, where it is not positively vituperative.
Various
marginalization

the social process of becoming or being made marginal

The complaints grew so loud and vociferous that even President Obama was forced to address the backlash from Lisbon on Saturday.
New York Times (Nov 23, 2010)
meld

lose its distinct outline or shape; blend gradually

The moment before she had confronted us, a silent agonised woman; now her words rattled forth with such feverish volubility we scarcely knew her.
Anna Katharine Green
metabolic

of or relating to metabolism

“He’s suddenly no longer the fearless assassin but he’s actually quite vulnerable down there because there’re sharks and other dangerous creatures,” Luehe said.
Forbes (Aug 1, 2013)
methodology

the techniques followed in a particular discipline

His report did not specify what the issues were, but said further investigation might be warranted.
New York Times (Jun 17, 2013)
meticulous

marked by precise accordance with details

Israel had relied initially on aerial bombing, shifting to a ground offensive only after days of withering guerrilla rocket attacks on its northern towns.
Reuters (Oct 29, 2012)
migration

the movement of persons from one locality to another

misnomer

an incorrect or unsuitable name

monopolize

have and control fully and exclusively

monotonous

tediously repetitious or lacking in variety

nave

the central area of a church

nomadic

migratory

notoriety

the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality

novel

original and of a kind not seen before

novelty

originality by virtue of being new and surprising

nuance

a subtle difference in meaning or opinion or attitude

obdurate

stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing

obscure

not clearly understood or expressed

obsequious

attempting to win favor from influential people by flattery

obsolete

no longer in use

orthodox

adhering to what is commonly accepted

panache

distinctive and stylish elegance

paradigm

the generally accepted perspective of a discipline

pellucid

transmitting light; able to be seen through with clarity

penitent

feeling or expressing remorse for misdeeds

perennial

lasting an indefinitely long time

perfunctory

hasty and without attention to detail; not thorough

peripheral

related to the key issue but not of central importance

persistence

steady determination

pithy

concise and full of meaning

placid

not easily irritated

polemical

of or involving dispute or controversy

posthumous

occurring or coming into existence after a person’s death

practicable

capable of being done with means at hand

pragmatism

the attribute of accepting the facts of life

precariously

in a manner affording no ease or reassurance

predominant

having superior power and influence

premeditate

consider, ponder, or plan beforehand

preternatural

surpassing the ordinary or normal

prevalent

most frequent or common

probity

complete and confirmed integrity

prodigality

the trait of spending extravagantly

profligate

unrestrained by convention or morality

profundity

intellectual depth; penetrating knowledge

prolixity

boring verbosity

prominent

conspicuous in position or importance

prophetic

foretelling events as if by supernatural intervention

prosaic

lacking wit or imagination

providential

peculiarly fortunate or appropriate

proximity

the property of being close together

pseudonym

a fictitious name used when performing a particular role

quixotic

not sensible about practical matters

reconcile

bring into consonance or accord

redundant

more than is needed, desired, or required

refined

cultivated and genteel

rein

keep in check

remedial

tending or intended to rectify or improve

resolute

firm in purpose or belief

restive

impatient especially under restriction or delay

reverence

a feeling of profound respect for someone or something

robust

sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction

row

an angry dispute

ruinous

extremely harmful; bringing catastrophe

rumination

a calm, lengthy, intent consideration

sartorial

of or relating to tailoring or clothing

scant

less than the correct or legal or full amount

scathing

marked by harshly abusive criticism

schism

division of a group into opposing factions

scrupulous

having ethical or moral principles

sham

something that is a counterfeit; not what it seems to be

skittish

unpredictably excitable, especially of horses

sporadically

in an irregular or unpredictable manner

static

not in physical motion

stigmatize

condemn or openly or formally or brand as disgraceful

stunning

causing bewilderment, shock, or insensibility

subjective

taking place within the mind and modified by individual bias

subtle

difficult to detect or grasp by the mind or analyze

subversion

the act of overthrowing or destroying, as a government

superfluous

more than is needed, desired, or required

surpass

be or do something to a greater degree

synoptic

presenting a summary or general view of a whole

quixotic

not sensible about practical matters

reconcile

bring into consonance or accord

redundant

more than is needed, desired, or required

refined

cultivated and genteel

rein

keep in check

remedial

tending or intended to rectify or improve

resolute

firm in purpose or belief

restive

impatient especially under restriction or delay

reverence

a feeling of profound respect for someone or something

robust

sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction

row

an angry dispute

ruinous

extremely harmful; bringing catastrophe

rumination

a calm, lengthy, intent consideration

sartorial

of or relating to tailoring or clothing

scant

less than the correct or legal or full amount

scathing

marked by harshly abusive criticism

schism

division of a group into opposing factions

scrupulous

having ethical or moral principles

sham

something that is a counterfeit; not what it seems to be

skittish

unpredictably excitable, especially of horses

sporadically

in an irregular or unpredictable manner

static

not in physical motion

stigmatize

condemn or openly or formally or brand as disgraceful

stunning

causing bewilderment, shock, or insensibility

subjective

taking place within the mind and modified by individual bias

subtle

difficult to detect or grasp by the mind or analyze

subversion

the act of overthrowing or destroying, as a government

superfluous

more than is needed, desired, or required

surpass

be or do something to a greater degree

synoptic

presenting a summary or general view of a whole

taciturn

habitually reserved and uncommunicative

temperance

the trait of avoiding excesses

tendentious

having a strong bias, especially a controversial one

terse

brief and to the point

thoroughgoing

performed comprehensively and completely

thrift

extreme care in spending money

tranquil

not agitated

transcend

be superior or better than some standard

trifling

not worth considering

trite

repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse

tumultuous

characterized by unrest or disorder or insubordination

undemonstrative

not given to open expression of emotion

underscore

give extra weight to

unprecedented

novel; having no earlier occurrence

unseemly

not in keeping with accepted standards of what is proper

variability

the quality of being uneven and lacking uniformity

variegated

having a variety of colors

venal

capable of being corrupted

venue

the scene of any event or action

verifiable

capable of being tested by experiment or observation

viable

capable of life or normal growth and development

vigorous

characterized by forceful and energetic action or activity

virulence

extreme harmfulness

visionary

a person with unusual powers of foresight

vituperative

marked by harshly abusive criticism

vociferous

conspicuously and offensively loud

volubility

the quality of being facile in speech and writing

vulnerable

capable of being wounded or hurt

warrant

show to be reasonable or provide adequate ground for

withering

wreaking or capable of wreaking complete destruction
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